Progress & Attainment

"Pupils are making good progress because of the improvements in teaching and careful tracking of their performance."

Ofsted

In 2016 The Standards and Testing Agency introduced the new national curriculum tests (commonly called SATs) to reflect the revised national curriculum launched in 2014. Test results are no longer reported as levels. Scaled scores are used instead to help calculate the new progress measures for schools like Bure Valley.

The way the Department for Education measure primary school performance at the end of key stage 2 (KS2) has changed, so instead of measuring progress for individual pupils, the new measures look at progress at a school level. Progress measures provide parents with information to help them understand how their school is performing and to inform school choices.

In order to calculate the school level progress measures, pupils’ results (at KS2) are compared to the achievements of other pupils across the country who had a similar starting point (prior attainment). Prior attainment is based on teacher assessment judgements at key stage 1 (KS1).

Schools have progress measures published for 3 subjects: reading, writing and maths.

There government believe that there are two main advantages to the new progress measures:

  1. They are fairer to schools because we can compare pupils with similar starting points to each other.
  2. They recognise the progress schools make with all their pupils, highlighting the best schools whose pupils go furthest, whatever their starting point.

Most schools will have progress scores between −5 and +5. If a school has a progress score of 0 this means that on average their pupils achieved similar results at the end of KS2 (end of year 6) to pupils in other schools with similar results at the end of KS1 (end of year 2). If a school has a positive progress score this means that on average their pupils made more progress than pupils in other schools with similar results at the end of KS1. This places an emphasis on the importance of reliable KS1 teacher assessments - especially for junior schools, like Bure Valley, who have no input to KS1 teacher assessments.

For example: a score of +3 in reading would mean that on average pupils at the school got 3 scaled score points more in the KS2 English reading test, compared to other pupils nationally with similar results at the end of KS1.   A negative score doesn’t mean a school has failed or pupils have made no progress. It just means that on average their pupils have made less progress than pupils in other schools with similar results at the end of KS1.

For example: a score of −4 in maths would mean that on average pupils at the school got 4 scaled score points fewer in the KS2 maths test, compared to other pupils nationally with similar results at the end of KS1.

It is important to note that:

  • Pupil progress isn’t always linear
  • Pupils successes shouldn’t be solely measured on attainment scores or progress measures
  • Progress can be measured in other ways
  • 80 is the lowest scaled score that can be awarded and 120 is the highest scaled score possible in the KS2 SATs tests
  • Pupils scoring at least a scaled score of 100+ will have met the expected standard of the test
  • A pupil awarded a scaled score of 99 or below has not met the expected standard in the test
  • To achieve the higher standard pupils will have scored 110+
  • Pupils whose raw score is below the minimum needed to be awarded a scaled score on the test have not demonstrated sufficient understanding of the KS2 curriculum in the subject
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